SHORT AND SWEET

A mismatch in the human realism of face and voice produces an uncanny valley

Wade J Mitchell

School of Informatics, Indiana University, 535 West Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

Kevin A Szerszen, Sr

School of Informatics, Indiana University, 535 West Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

Amy Shirong Lu

School of Informatics, Indiana University, 535 West Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

Paul W Schermerhorn

Cognitive Science Program, Indiana University, 1900 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47406

Matthias Scheutz

Cognitive Science Program, Indiana University, 1900 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47406

Karl F MacDorman

School of Informatics, Indiana University, 535 West Michigan St, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

kmacdorm@indiana.edu

   

Abstract. The uncanny valley has become synonymous with the uneasy feeling of viewing an animated character or robot that looks imperfectly human. Although previous uncanny valley experiments have focused on relations among a character’s visual elements, the current experiment examines whether a mismatch in the human realism of a character’s face and voice causes it to be evaluated as eerie. The results support this hypothesis.


Cite as: Mitchell W J, Szerszen, Sr K A, Lu A S, Schermerhorn P W, Scheutz M, MacDorman K F, 2011, "A mismatch in the human realism of face and voice produces an uncanny valley" i-Perception 2(1) 10–12; doi:10.1068/i0415
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DOI: 10.1068/i0415

ISSN: 2041-6695 (electronic only)

Copyright: Copyright is retained by the author(s) of this article. This open-access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Licence, which permits noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction, provided the original author(s) and source are credited and no alterations are made.
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